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Myopia Control

Myopia, or near-sightedness, is a vision condition in which, without any vision correction, near objects are seen clearly, but distant objects are out of focus.

Why does myopia occur?

When the eyeball is too long or if the front of the eye (cornea) is too curved, light entering the eye is not focused properly onto the back of the eye (retina). The retina is the sensory layer of the eye that relays light as neural signals to the brain which allows us to see. Myopia describes the condition where lights are improperly focused onto the retina resulting in a blurry image being seen.

Myopia has both a genetic and environmental component. Children with parents who have myopia are more likely to be myopic themselves and show a faster rate of myopic progression. Increased near work such as reading and tablet use is also correlated with increased rate of myopia in children.

How common is myopia?

Myopia is a very common visual condition that currently affects 30% of the population. By 2050, the prevalence of myopia is estimated to increase to 50% of the world’s population. Along with the rising prevalence, myopia is occurring in earlier ages starting in childhood (6-7 years of age) and progressing at a more rapid rate than the previous generations.

How is myopia diagnosed?

Getting a routine eye exam is the best way to diagnose myopia. At the eye exam, the optometrist will perform tests to determine if there is a prescription for myopia. People with myopia will have trouble seeing distant objects, such as the road sign, whiteboard, movie screen and TV. However, children with myopia may not report symptoms of blur because their vision is all they have known and assume everyone sees the way they see. Therefore, routine eye exams are crucial for the early detection and management of myopia. 

How is myopia treated?

Once myopia is diagnosed, glasses and contact lenses are the most common form of vision correction used to allow the individual to see clearly. Laser procedures (such as LASIK or PRK) and other surgical procedures (such as lens implants) may help to reduce an individual’s dependence on glasses or contact lenses. 

High amounts of myopia is associated with increased risk of sight threatening conditions including retinal detachments, cataracts, glaucoma and myopic maculopathy. It is important to note that glasses, contact lenses, laser procedures and other surgical procedures are only altering the way that light enters the eyes, but they do not cure myopia and the sight threatening risks associated with it.

We offer Pre and Post Operative Care

Our office is committed to providing care for our communities. Should you need to go out of town for a procedure, we are able to co-manage your pre and post-operative care with your surgeon. Please be sure to contact our office as soon as you know your operative dates so that we can have you scheduled in. 

Once myopia is diagnosed, glasses and contact lenses are the most common form of vision correction used to allow the individual to see clearly. Laser procedures (such as LASIK or PRK) and other surgical procedures (such as lens implants) may help to reduce an individual’s dependence on glasses or contact lenses.

Refractive surgery
Probably the most well-known use of lasers in vision care is laser refractive surgery.  Lasers help surgeons reshape the cornea, the clear tissue at the front of the eye, to allow for better light refraction and clearer vision in people with myopiahyperopia, and astigmatism.
Since its beginnings in the 1980s, laser refractive surgery has come a long way, with newer techniques allowing faster healing, fewer side effects, and less post-operative pain. 
Current procedures include:

  • LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). A surgeon uses a blade or laser to cut a flap in the cornea and uses a computer-guided laser to reshape the tissue underneath. Recovery time is typically a day or two, with almost immediate vision improvement.

  • Wavefront-guided LASIK. A computer maps out the surface of the eye, which helps the surgeon reshape the eye with a bladeless laser to change the way the cornea reflects light.

  • PRK (photorefractive keratectomy). The entire layer of corneal epithelium is removed, so that a laser can remove and reshape the tissue underneath (no flap is created). The recovery time is approximately one week, and vision usually improves within two weeks.

Not everyone is a good candidate for laser refractive surgery.  Contact us to book an eye health and vision assessment to determine your particular risk factors and candidacy.

Computer Vision Syndrome

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